Tuesday, February 11, 2014

FREE short story Fifty Fifty

*
free for 5 days at Amazon Kindle

My short story ebook at Amazon Kindle, Fifty Fifty, is FREE starting today February 11, 2014 and will be free until February 15. (You don't need a Kindle to read eBooks from Amazon.)

Do not buy this in lieu of getting your loved-one a Valentine. This is not a Valentine story. 
But don't forget to give your love to somone Friday.

This is a war story. Maybe not the way war mostly happens, but one with a better outcome for two enemies with a fifty-fifty chance of going home in a body bag.

War is purgatory. Waiting is hell.

You can download it for free from Amazon for 5 days starting today. DO IT HERE Hurry before all the electrons in the internets get used up.
How the internet works

Here is a review of "Fifty Fifty" by award winning author and ex Vietnam War helicopter pilot Byron Edgington (The Sky Behind Me at Amazon)

4.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful/improbable fantasy of war February 6, 2014
Format:Kindle Edition|Amazon Verified Purchase
Here we have a short story of war, which, if it turned out to be true may well be the ultimate wonderful if improbable fantasy this war weary world needs to read and believe in. One of our protagonists, Nelson, is an American GI in Afghanistan. Trapped, cynical, deeply judgmental and prejudiced against `the ragheads' he confronts in the interminable Afghan conflict, Nelson finds himself at an impasse with his enemy, `Behnam,' (not Omar). Nelson can't move and neither can the Afghani. Both men are stuck where they are, with no relief in sight from units or comrades. One false move and one or the other of them will die.
A short review for a short story impels me to say that this is a marvelous if impossible tale of two men facing each other across more than a dusty alley in a remote part of the remotest land in the world. Reminiscent of the great Saki short story, The Interlopers, (but with a different ending), Fifty Fifty resolves itself in a series of feints and false moves: Nelson trying to justify his anger and racism, yearning to return to Red Hook Brooklyn and stop the crazy obligation to make up for his cousin's death; Behnam surrendering his automatic hatred, following Nelson's lead, and... Well, you'll have to read it.
The story does require a willing suspension of disbelief. With very rare exceptions, military units don't leave individual troops behind. The resolution arrives pretty quickly, but it does satisfy. And there isn't enough bravado and jabber from the Afghani across the alley in response.
All in all a satisfying tale that can be read in a few minutes, almost like a long-ish Haiku of war and its insane purposes.
Byron Edgington, author of The Sky Behind Me: A Memoir of Flying & Life

Thank you for reading. See you next time?

Monday, February 10, 2014

Johnny Don't March

I was invited to the My Writing Process Blog Tour by UK writer Anne Shilton,
C.A. Shilton, author of Barricades-The Journey of Javert

Anne’s Amazon author page is HERE
Her blog is HERE

At the end of this blog tour I’ll introduce you to the two writers who will pick up the tour from here next week.


Getting to the interview questions:

Author, Timothy Hurley's work in progress is Johnny Don't March, a novella.


What are you working on?
I recently completed the rough draft of my novella, Johnny Don’t March, due out in late 2014. Nelson returns from war branded a hero, but he doesn’t want the role, and his dark Afghanistan memories threaten to explode the “normal” life he craves. I am in revisions now, and I expect to take several months of polishing before it’s ready to send to my copy editor. At the same time, I’m working on ideas for the cover of the book, which takes place in Brooklyn and Manhattan. 

How does your work differ from others of its genre?
That will depend on how my story polishes out during revisions, and how readers accept it. The theme of war’s toll on young men and women is prominent now in fiction and journalism. I am aware of Joyce Carol Oates’ new book, Carthage, and decided not to read it yet, as I don’t want it to influence my revisions.

Why do you write what you do?
Boy, if any writer knows the real answer to that, they must be ready for elevation to minor deity. A story, or a scene, or a bit of dialogue gets in my head and won’t leave me alone until I work with it. Johnny Don’t March started as a short story I was revising last year. It kept growing and the story morphed into my first novella. I’m very excited and a bit intimidated by the process unfolding, but I like the result so far. I’m anxious to get into revisions and make every sentence say precisely what I want it to.

How does your writing process work?
When I am writing first rough draft, I find the early morning hours best. By that I mean 3 o’clock in the morning. I will have done a good deal of reading and research by the time I start a rough draft, but during the writing I halt and do more research along the way. In a new scene or new chapter the first sentence can be the hardest. I write the first thing that comes to me, no matter how crappy. Even if I delete or change it later, that gets the ball rolling, and the writing seems to flow on its own after that. I have a vague notion or outline where I think the story is going, but I find surprises and it goes where it wants, characters change, plot evolves. For revisions and editing I work most any time of day. I expect to have this novella ready to send to a professional editor in six months. Maybe seven. Probably ten.




 I invited Iowa writer Buzz Malone, author of Silence of Centerville, to pick up the tour on 17 February 2014 and tell about his new novel, which has just finished revisions and goes to the editor. Find his blog HERE 
Iowa writer, Buzz Malone, author of Silence of Centerville


About author Buzz Malone: Buzz Malone was raised in the slow rolling Southern Iowa hills where both sides of his family have lived for generations. As a child he listened in wonder and amazement at the oral histories of the people and places that surrounded him. Now, through his own fictional accounts, he gives voice to those long forgotten stories in his works of historical literary fiction. "I wrote my first novel at the age of seven," claims author Buzz Malone.
"However upon review, it turned out to be eerily similar to the plot and story line of star wars, but with a guy named 'Jim' instead of 'Luke'. Now, some thirty years later I am still stealing the best of bits and pieces of oral histories and Iowa events, and attempting to breathe new life into them.



Also blogging for the tour on that date will be Colorado author, C. R. Hodges, science fiction/fantasy writer and author of eBook The Cavalryman’s Saber. His blog is HERE. He’ll tell about his success with mythica short stories and his novels-in-progress.

Colorado writer, C. R. Hodges, author of The Cavalryman's Saber



About author C. R. Hodges: C.R. Hodges lives in Colorado with his wife, three daughters, a dog, a turtle and no ghosts that he knows of. He has seven short stories published with two more under contract for publication in 2013. His work has appeared in EscapePod, On the Premises, Bards and Sages Quarterly, The First Line, and Kazka Press. When he is not writing, playing the tuba or coaching youth softball, he runs a product development and industrialization services company.

Tune in on February 17 for Buzz Malone's and C. R. Hodges' blogs.

After this blog tour my short story Fifty Fifty will be a FREE ebook at Amazon Kindle February 11 (Monday) to 15 (Friday). Full disclosure: it is not a Valentine story. (adult language)

Thanks for reading. See ya again?

Sunday, February 9, 2014

Review of "Waiting on Alma"

Gary Horton, novelist (Some Glad Morning) and syndicated PEN short story writer reviewed "Waiting on Alma" and rated it 5 stars.

5.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Story. February 6, 2014
Format:Kindle Edition|Amazon Verified Purchase
This story is a real treat and stirred so many emotions in me. It brought tears to my eyes. The author is an accomplished writer with a fine eye for details, not just the physical details of a scene but details of the heart too. He has a gentle style that speaks of a quiet maturity. I hope he has more stories in the works and I hope he has a novel in him too. This is wonderful writing.

Please drop by The Lunatic Assylum tomorrow MONDAY FEBRUARY 10 for the blog tour interview about my work-in-progress, the novella Johnny Don't March, and the start of five FREE days for my short story Fifty Fifty at Amazon ebooks.

Thanks for reading. See ya tomorrow?

Thursday, February 6, 2014

Reviews of "Waiting on Alma" and "Fifty Fifty"

Here are reviews of my short stories, "Waiting on Alma" and "Fifty Fifty" written by award winning author Byron Edgington, author of The Sky Behind Me. Check out his many well written reviews on his blog and at Amazon.



Here we have a short tale about Alma, a cancer patient, Seamus her spouse of many years and the physician who remains unnamed throughout, but who has cared for Alma for a while. Told in close third, from the doctor’s viewpoint, this is a tale of misunderstanding, resolution, cultural differences and a gentle passing. It appears the good doctor has been ‘waiting on Alma’ to die for a long time. Seamus knows his spouse is about to die. When she does, he takes over her passing, becoming the physician. “We give her time to leave. That’s why the window is open.” The doctor uses none of his acquired skills to assist Alma’s passing. Indeed, the patient is deceased when he arrives. His role here is to honor her by putting aside traditional medical protocols and allow Seamus’ mystical ways to intervene. The doctor’s misunderstanding vanishes, his impatience dissipates over hot tea and he waits with Seamus while Alma leaves. More information and conflict in the doctor’s mind would have taken this heartwarming story from four to five stars. Indeed, given the current crisis in western medicine, and its clash with non-traditional, complementary and integrative therapies, this could be expanded to novella length. It’s a good read in any case, a tender tale of one man’s determination to wait for his wife to cross the chasm no physician, or anyone else can ever understand.

Here we have a short story of war, which, if it turned out to be true may well be the ultimate wonderful if improbable fantasy this war weary world needs to read and believe in. One of our protagonists, Nelson, is an American GI in Afghanistan. Trapped, cynical, deeply judgmental and prejudiced against ‘the ragheads’ he confronts in the interminable Afghan conflict, Nelson finds himself at an impasse with his enemy, ‘Behnam,’ (not Omar). Nelson can’t move and neither can the Afghani. Both men are stuck where they are, with no relief in sight from units or comrades. One false move and one or the other of them will die. 

A short review for a short story impels me to say that this is a marvelous if impossible tale of two men facing each other across more than a dusty alley in a remote part of the remotest land in the world. Reminiscent of the great Saki short story, The Interlopers, (but with a different ending), Fifty Fifty resolves itself in a series of feints and false moves: Nelson trying to justify his anger and racism, yearning to return to Red Hook Brooklyn and stop the crazy obligation to make up for his cousin’s death; Behnam surrendering his automatic hatred, following Nelson’s lead, and… Well, you’ll have to read it. 
The story does require a willing suspension of disbelief. With very rare exceptions, military units don’t leave individual troops behind. The resolution arrives pretty quickly, but it does satisfy. And there isn’t enough bravado and jabber from the Afghani across the alley in response. 
All in all a satisfying tale that can be read in a few minutes, almost like a long-ish Haiku of war and its insane purposes.

Thank you for reading. See you back, I hope, for the blog tour interview on February 10, Monday, about my work-in-progress, Johnny Don't March. Starting with the interview on February 10 my short story Fifty Fifty will be FREE at Amazon Kindle for 5 days. (adult language)